National Centre for
Citizenship and the Law

Arts Council England
HLF Logo

Call: 0115 952 0555
Book your Visit

We inspire...

Young People by delivering Law and Justice education at national heritage sites.

We inspire...

Young People by delivering Law and Justice education at national heritage sites.

We inspire...

Young People by delivering Law and Justice education at national heritage sites.

We inspire...

Young People by delivering Law and Justice education at national heritage sites.

About Us

NCCL is part of the registered charity, National Justice Museum.

We inspire young people to learn from the past, act in the present and change their future

National Justice Museum comprises of the Galleries of Justice Museum, The City of Caves and the National Centre for Citizenship & the Law (NCCL).

Uniquely, NCCL  provides the opportunity for young people of all ages and abilities to learn outside of the classroom in working or historic courtrooms providing an unparalleled learning experience.

Where We Work:

London: Royal Courts of Justice and Rolls Building

Nottingham: Galleries of Justice Museum and City of Caves

Manchester/the North West: The Civil Justice Centre and Crown Court, Bolton Magistrates’ Court

History of the Organisation: 

The headquarters of the Trust are at the Galleries of Justice Museum, an independent museum that seeks to preserve the site of the Shire Hall and its collections, including HM Prison service collection and allow access to visitors and clients who wish to learn about the law and its historic legacy.

The Galleries of Justice Museum is housed in the Grade II listed Shire Hall in the heart of the Nottingham’s historic Lace Market. There has been a court on the site since at least 1375 and a prison since at least 1449. Over the centuries, many thousands of people have entered the building with a sense of dread for their future. The very steps to the entrance were the site of many public executions.

The Egalitarian Trust (now National Justice Museum) was originally formed in 1993 as The Museum of Law Trust Company under the Chairmanship of Mr RM Stevenson OBE DL Hon MA and Deputy Chair Mr Geoffrey Bond OBE DL to save the building from potential demolition. It was opened as a museum with the title of the Galleries of Justice in April 1995, incorporating the 18th and 19th Century county gaol and two Victorian court rooms in all their original splendour, and in regular use until the closure of the court in 1986. The Museum has since developed over time…

Presently, The NCCL delivers education sessions to over 20,000 children a year who take part in the Courts of Justice programme within the courts and heritage sites across England. With the support of the Ministry of Justice and the Foyle Foundation and others the NCCL has successfully expanded and now delivers its programmes at the Royal Courts of Justice, the Supreme Court in London, the Sessions House in Northampton and most recently the Civil Justice Centre and Crown Court in Manchester.

 

Exciting Changes at the NCCL

From 1st April 2017 we will become part of the new National Justice Museum and will be known as ‘National Justice Museum Education’. With access to the UK’s largest collection relating to law, justice, crime and punishment, we will be launching a brand new education programme, which we will continue to deliver at legal and heritage sites in Nottingham, London and the North West.

Click here to see our purpose, mission and vision.

IMG_0741

 

The NCCL and Galleries of Justice Museum Highlights Timeline:

 

  • 1993:  The Museum of Law Trust was established in order to save the Shire Hall in Nottingham from dereliction and turn it into a museum of national significance
  • 1995:  The trustees raised millions of pounds to restore the buildings and open them as a museum
  • 2000:  Tim Desmond, the current CEO, developed the charity’s education department into the National Centre for Citizenship and the Law (NCCL)
  • 2003:  Winner of the inaugural Gulbenkian prize
  • 2005:  The charity became the Egalitarian Trust with two divisions: the NCCL and Visitor Attractions, which includes The Galleries of Justice Museum and The City of Caves and in the same year the Home Office bequeathed its HM Prison Service Collection to the museum
  • 2007:  Winner of Nottinghamshire Museum of the year
  • 2011:  Awarded the prestigious Sandford Award
  • 2012: It’s Independent Nottingham – Special Award for Community Contribution
  • 2013: Museums and Heritage Awards Best Educational Initiative “I Pledge”
  • 2014: Visit England Gold Award for Best Visitor Attraction in England
  •            Nottinghamshire Heritage Forum Bi-Annual Award for working with young people and children – I Pledge Project
  •            ‘Learning Outside the Classroom’ quality badge for NCCL – Nottingham
  • 2015: EMHA ‘Highly Commended’ certificate for ‘Engaging Young People’ for PLES
  •            ‘Learning Outside the Classroom’ quality badge awarded to NCCL at the RCJ
  • 2016: School Travel Awards: Best Venue for History Learning (The Galleries of Justice Museum) and Best Heritage Venue (Royal Courts of Justice)

 

Click here to see  the short  NCCL Justice Programme video 

courtroom education